Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum’s Facebook Wall 2011-08-30 15:16:45


Work in the Museum!!
We are looking for enthusiastic students to work in the museum this semester. If you are at least a sophomore of good academic standing with an interest in archaeology, please send a copy of your C.V...

Great News!!! We’ve extended our hours for the Fall!! Come see the collection M…

Great News!!!
We've extended our hours for the Fall!!
Come see the collection Monday-Friday 10:30-1:30

They don’t make toys like this anymore!! Learn more in this short article writte…

They don't make toys like this anymore!! Learn more in this short article written by one of Hérica Valledares' students last semester!!


Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
archaeologicalmuseum.jhu.edu
The terracotta dolphin in the JHUAM was most likely a mold-made child’s rattle. The dolphin is shown in profile with raised tail and snout, pronounced fins, lateral gill-like grooves, and an S-curve body. Given its gentle demeanor and elegant form, the dolphin was viewed as man’s special friend an...

Learn more about these beautiful Roman earrings in this brief and informative sy…

Learn more about these beautiful Roman earrings in this brief and informative synopsis written by Keelin Martinek in Hérica Valledares' Spring undergraduate seminar!


Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
archaeologicalmuseum.jhu.edu
The Romans were known for their love of gemstones, especially emeralds and pearls. The precious materials used to manufacture this pair of earrings originated from different far-flung regions of the ancient world. While gold was mined in a number of Roman provinces (mainly Britain, Spain, Dalmatia...

Graduate student Ashley Fiutko examines and photographs ancient Egyptian amulets…

Graduate student Ashley Fiutko examines and photographs ancient Egyptian amulets using the museum's new digital microscope/camera. Here, she is studying a faience Djed-pillar, one of the most popular type of amulets from Ancient Egypt. Djed-pillars were believed to be a representation of the backbone of Osiris, god of the underworld, and as a hieroglyph can be read as the word "stability." Faience is the term used


What we do here
Graduate student Ashley Fiutko examines and photographs ancient Egyptian amulets using the museum's new digital microscope/camera. Here, she is studying a faience Djed-pillar, one of the most popular type of amulets from Ancient Egypt. Djed-pillars were believed to be a representation of the backbone of Osiris, god of the underworld, and as a hieroglyph can be read as the word "stability." Faience is the term used to describe ceramic objects with brightly colored opaque glazes, and Egyptian faience is perhaps best known for its bright blue and bright blue-green coloration. This Djed-pillar was once part of the Cohen Collection of Egyptian Antiquities.

Learn more about the "Piggyback Girls" on display in the museum’s Tanagra, Fake…

Learn more about the "Piggyback Girls" on display in the museum's Tanagra, Fake or Real? case.


Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
archaeologicalmuseum.jhu.edu
Ephedrismos groups, or piggyback girls, were frequently represented in Hellestic art, and were particularly popular as small-scale terracotta figurines. More than forty terracotta statuettes of piggyback girls have been unearthed since the 19th century. This subject matter was taken from monumental ...

Museum staff members/JHU undergraduates Kierra Foley and Monika Lay help identif…

Museum staff members/JHU undergraduates Kierra Foley and Monika Lay help identify the accession numbers and label ancient artifacts before they are put in their new storage locations. These ceramic votive cups and bronze mirrors were recently re-housed in archival storage boxes so that they would be more accessible and readily available for teaching and research."


What we do here