Medical and Surgical Instruments, Part 2

By
Jennifer Torres
Jennifer Torres is the Collections Technician of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Her primary duties include the rehousing and photography of the museum’s collection. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Florida, where she received her B.A. in Anthropology and Classical Studies in 2013. In 2015, she received her M.A. in Museum Studies with a concentration in Collections Management from the George Washington University.

Rehousing work has continued for the collection of medical and surgical instruments from the ancient city of Colophon. Shown here are two cupping vessels which were commonly used in ancient healing practices. Vessels such as these were heated and then placed on the body. As the air within the vessel began to cool, it would suck the skin into the neck of the vessel and draw out impurities in the body. In doing so, it was thought that a person’s health could be restored. Even today, popular athletes practice cupping.