Our kiln unloading was as unexpected as our first. You never know how things will come out of a furnace that goes up to 1100 degrees C! We learned quite a bit--that higher temperatures might be better for our slip to turn black; that even further prolonging and controlling our reduction phase might be useful; and we've got to figure out how to better position our wares so that we get a reducing atmosphere going across (and into) concave surfaces. Plus, we need saggars to deal with all that pesky fly ash. Back to the drawing (painting, slipping?) board.


Unloading the kiln!
Our kiln unloading was as unexpected as our first. You never know how things will come out of a furnace that goes up to 1100 degrees C! We learned quite a bit--that higher temperatures might be better for our slip to turn black; that even further prolonging and controlling our reduction phase might be useful; and we've got to figure out how to better position our wares so that we get a reducing atmosphere going across (and into) concave surfaces. Plus, we need saggars to deal with all that pesky fly ash. Back to the drawing (painting, slipping?) board.
We've learned a lot in the second firing of our Greek kiln. Thermocouples on our different kiln shelves told us how different the heat distribution is from the top to the bottom of the kiln. We controlled our reduction phase of the firing much better. And we made it through the whole firing in 10 hours...would have been faster had it not been for a pesky slump in temperature around 780 degrees C. What will our fired results look like? Stay tuned, we open our kiln tomorrow!


Firing the Ancient Greek Kiln, Take 2
We've learned a lot in the second firing of our Greek kiln. Thermocouples on our different kiln shelves told us how different the heat distribution is from the top to the bottom of the kiln. We controlled our reduction phase of the firing much better. And we made it through the whole firing in 10 hours...would have been faster had it not been for a pesky slump in temperature around 780 degrees C. What will our fired results look like? Stay tuned, we open our kiln tomorrow!
Sanchita Balachandran at the kiln Baltimore Clayworks earlier today.


Timeline Photos
Sanchita Balachandran at the kiln Baltimore Clayworks earlier today.


Timeline Photos
You know you've missed those weekly updates on our attempts to recreate ancient Greek ceramics. So here you are, another chance to see our valiant attempt (take 2) to figure out how those geniuses in the ancient world made red clay go from red to black to red and black. We firing tomorrow Baltimore Clayworks, stop by from about noon to 8pm if you want to help stoke the fire. Nothing like thunderstorms, 90 degree weather and a fire going up to almost 1700 degrees Fahrenheit to keept hings interesting! Wish us luck!


Ancient Greek Kiln Firing, Take 2
You know you've missed those weekly updates on our attempts to recreate ancient Greek ceramics. So here you are, another chance to see our valiant attempt (take 2) to figure out how those geniuses in the ancient world made red clay go from red to black to red and black. We firing tomorrow @[134129173324786:274:Baltimore Clayworks], stop by from about noon to 8pm if you want to help stoke the fire. Nothing like thunderstorms, 90 degree weather and a fire going up to almost 1700 degrees Fahrenheit to keept hings interesting! Wish us luck!
Today is Sam M.'s final day volunteering with us. He's done so much so well, from creating archival containers (seen here) to organizing xeroradiographs, to photographing ancient Roman stone inscriptions, to assembling complex storage furniture! We're grateful to him for his work, and wish him the very best as he heads off to Davidson College!


Thanks Sam!
Today is Sam M.'s final day volunteering with us. He's done so much so well, from creating archival containers (seen here) to organizing xeroradiographs, to photographing ancient Roman stone inscriptions, to assembling complex storage furniture! We're grateful to him for his work, and wish him the very best as he heads off to Davidson College!
A great article featuring lots of quotes by students in the spring course "Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics". Thanks to writer Mary Zajac and photographer Will Kirk!
http://krieger.jhu.edu/magazine/2015/05/getting-hands-on-with-ancient-greece/


Getting Hands-on with Ancient Greece | Arts & Sciences Magazine | Johns Hopkins University
krieger.jhu.edu
Getting Hands-on with Ancient Greece By Mary K. Zajac Bright winter sunshine streams through the Palladian window in Baltimore Clayworks’ studio, casting stripes of light across the blackboard and the row of Krieger School undergraduates who are balanced on three-legged stools, each of them in front…
The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum was fortunate enough to have Garrison Forest School student Sarah Kate intern at the museum this semester. Sarah Kate is part of the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Program, and joined the museum in February and just completed her work with us this week. Sarah Kate has been rehousing our collection of ancient Egyptian stone tools (lithics) so that it can be used more extensively for teaching. Sarah Kate has been working on a number of tasks to make this collection more accessible, including carefully measuring each object and fabricating custom storage boxes and mounts for each tool. Her hard work has prepared our lithic collection for future research and teaching. Thank you Sarah Kate for all your work!


We've recently had a wonderful volunteer work with us at the museum. Here's more from Sam M. himself, describing his work thus far: Hello, my name is Sam M., a senior at Friends School of Baltimore. For the past two weeks I have participated in a work-study project at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. My job in the museum is to help and benefit the efficiency of any current projects at the museum; this may include scanning, cataloging, translating, etc. As a 5 year Latin scholar, I have become especially interested by many of the Ancient Roman artifacts and Latin inscriptions. Here, I am comparing ancient coins from our collection with xero-radiographs, a type of x-ray that we found in our collection. These ancient coins and other artifacts from our collection can be used as a snapshot into their original time periods, locations and cultures. As I see it, without cataloging and researching these artifacts, their significance may be lost in history. This work-study has advanced my passion for Latin and Ancient History and I am very thankful for this opportunity.


Thank you Sam M.!
We've recently had a wonderful volunteer work with us at the museum. Here's more from Sam M. himself, describing his work thus far: Hello, my name is Sam M., a senior at @[146989856233:274:Friends School of Baltimore]. For the past two weeks I have participated in a work-study project at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. My job in the museum is to help and benefit the efficiency of any current projects at the museum; this may include scanning, cataloging, translating, etc. As a 5 year Latin scholar, I have become especially interested by many of the Ancient Roman artifacts and Latin inscriptions. Here, I am comparing ancient coins from our collection with xero-radiographs, a type of x-ray that we found in our collection. These ancient coins and other artifacts from our collection can be used as a snapshot into their original time periods, locations and cultures. As I see it, without cataloging and researching these artifacts, their significance may be lost in history. This work-study has advanced my passion for Latin and Ancient History and I am very thankful for this opportunity.
The "Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics" course is in this month's JHU Gazette. Pick up a copy on campus or read about us on line! Congratulations to Matt Hyleck of Baltimore Clayworks for his amazing contribution and guidance! http://hub.jhu.edu/gazette/2015/may-june/datebook-ksas-archaeology-project


Unlocking the secrets of ancient Greek pottery
hub.jhu.edu
Students collaborate with expert ceramics artists to recreate the iconic red-figure kylixes