http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/university-museums-important-role-highlighted/2009053.article


University museums' ‘important role’ highlighted
www.timeshighereducation.co.uk
Report pays tribute to museums big and small
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!


Stones of the Ages
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!


Stones of the Ages
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!
Interested in working at the Museum? We're hiring JHU sophomores and juniors! Please email archmuseum@jhu.edu with the following information by midnight Sept 30th. Selected students will be interviewed and hired in mid-October. Send in:
--a cover letter that describes your interest in the museum and any experience or coursework that would be applicable
--a resume
--the names of two JHU faculty who can recommend your work.
Students with all majors are welcome. You must be available to work for at least three hours a week during the museum's open hours, Monday through Friday from 10:30-1:30.
MERCI! Thanks to Professor Guido Furci's "Advanced Writing and Speaking in French" course for visiting the museum and looking at Roman Egyptian mummy portrait heads as part of their coursework.


The museum just was awarded a $136,000 "Museums for America" grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services! Learn more about our award and our plans for it here:
http://hub.jhu.edu/2014/09/18/archaeological-museum-imls-grant


An exhibition on Mendes Cohen, who donated nearly 700 ancient Egyptian objects to the Archaeological Museum in 1884, opens on Sunday. Come to see objects that the Museum has loaned to the exhibit. You can also hear a panel discussion (including panelist Curator/Conservator Sanchita Balachandran) on the creation of the exhibit at 5:45pm.


jewishmuseummd.org
jewishmuseummd.org
The Museum will be on Baltimore Public Radio (fm 88.1) this coming Thursday at 5:45pm. In the spring semester, Curator/Conservator Sanchita Balachandran will teach a course attempting to recreating ancient Greek ceramics in the museum's collection. Here's a sneak peak of the course. All undergraduate and graduate students--in disciplines from archaeology, classics, art history, chemistry, art, materials science and any others who are ready to work with clay are welcome to join in! http://www.mdhc.org/programs/humanities-connection/on-air-segments/


Upcoming Segments | Maryland Humanities Council
www.mdhc.org
Enjoyed a Humanities Connection segment on WYPR 88.1FM and want to learn more? Access segment-specific additional resources & media or listen to archived podcasts.
Post by Cari G.: On Thursday July 3rd, 2014, we finished working on our final reports and then we presented them at the end of the first half of class. Each group we had a ceramic and a metal object. The presentations described what type of object we had, any damage or technical detail that we observed on it, using either the microscope, ultraviolet light and, or x-ray fluorescence. We also described how we thought the object was put together: (ie: casting, molding, wheel thrown). In our presentations, we also talked about the history of the objects, its possible date and culture. After the presentations, we had a quick lecture on organic materials including wood, leather, basketry, and papyrus. Ivory was also an organic material we talked about during the lecture. We learned that ivory was referred to animal teeth. We spent the afternoon visiting the Peabody Library and looking at objects at the Walters Art Museum.


Examining Archaeological Objects: Our last day
Post by Cari G.: On Thursday July 3rd, 2014, we finished working on our final reports and then we presented them at the end of the first half of class. Each group we had a ceramic and a metal object. The presentations described what type of object we had, any damage or technical detail that we observed on it, using either the microscope, ultraviolet light and, or x-ray fluorescence. We also described how we thought the object was put together: (ie: casting, molding, wheel thrown). In our presentations, we also talked about the history of the objects, its possible date and culture. After the presentations, we had a quick lecture on organic materials including wood, leather, basketry, and papyrus. Ivory was also an organic material we talked about during the lecture. We learned that ivory was referred to animal teeth. We spent the afternoon visiting the Peabody Library and looking at objects at the Walters Art Museum.
Post by Cari G.: On Tuesday, July 2nd, 2014 we talked and learned about x-ray florescence and how to detect which elements are in each object by using x-rays. X-rays hit the electrons in atoms and a detector reads the energy changes that take place as electrons move around in their orbitals around the nucleus. By viewing the periodic chart, you can see which energy levels are associated with different elements. After the lecture on x-ray florescence, we took a field trip to the Baltimore Museum of Art. During the visit, we looked at the Antioch mosaics and looked at how missing sections and restorations were dealt with. We also saw bronze statues, and looked for weld lines, foundry marks and patinas. Another thing we talked about while in the museum was the way in which pigments were used, particularly in paintings.


Examining Archaeological Objects: At the Baltimore Museum of Art
Post by Cari G.: On Tuesday, July 2nd, 2014 we talked and learned about x-ray florescence and how to detect which elements are in each object by using x-rays. X-rays hit the electrons in atoms and a detector reads the energy changes that take place as electrons move around in their orbitals around the nucleus. By viewing the periodic chart, you can see which energy levels are associated with different elements. After the lecture on x-ray florescence, we took a field trip to the Baltimore Museum of Art. During the visit, we looked at the Antioch mosaics and looked at how missing sections and restorations were dealt with. We also saw bronze statues, and looked for weld lines, foundry marks and patinas. Another thing we talked about while in the museum was the way in which pigments were used, particularly in paintings.