For Halloween's eve, enjoy a dialogue written by students in Professor Guido Furci's Advanced Writing and Speaking course who conjured a conversation between Roman Egyptian mummy masks. Well done and merci to students Elli Bergren, Laura Maria Bou Delgado, Emily Brown, Maria Chroneos, Miles Clark, Joshua Clarke, Julin Justin, Stephen Langer, Victoria Marlin, Willah Peers, and Naomi Rodgers.

Dialogue avec un masque –
● Étudiant de FLE(French as a Foreign Language) : « Ça va ? »
○ Masque : « Je suis mort depuis des siècles, ça va pas plus que ça. »
● Étudiant de FLE : « Pourtant vous avez l’air en forme, exception faite de quelques rides. Mais je sais bien que c’est la pierre et non votre peau. »
○ Masque : « Monsieur, vous me flattez ! Ne seriez-vous pas en train de me draguer..? »
● Étudiant de FLE : « C’est bientôt Halloween… Sortir avec un masque, ce serait trop la classe ! »

Translation (by Eric Bulakites):
Dialogue with a mask –
● FLE Student : “How are you?”
○ Mask : “I’ve been dead for centuries, how do you think it’s going?”
● FLE Student : “But you look so good, except for a few wrinkles. But I know that it’s just the stone and not your skin.”
○ Mask : “Sir, you flatter me! Are you flirting with me..?”
● FLE Student : “Halloween’s coming… Going out with a mask would be so cool!”


THE WORKING DEAD. Something spooky is happening at the museum for Halloween. Come and hear a museum chat about the ancient Egyptian working dead, featuring Egyptology graduate students Meredith Fraser and Ashley Fiutko Arico, Oct 31st, 12:15 to 12:45. See you there!


http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/university-museums-important-role-highlighted/2009053.article


University museums' ‘important role’ highlighted
www.timeshighereducation.co.uk
Report pays tribute to museums big and small
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!


Stones of the Ages
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!


Stones of the Ages
Senior Alex Sivitskis has been working to catalog our collection of stone samples. Totaling to around 300 objects, this collection comprises of architectural fragments, stone tools, and natural samples acquired from various locations around the ancient world. Alex is working to identify both the archaeological provenance and geological classification of each sample. Our goal is to build a comprehensive catalog of this information in order to use the collection for teaching purposes. Some of the most interesting finds have been a large fragment of Egyptian alabaster, a chert eolith from the Theban plateau, and a sample of petrified wood with rounded, glossy nodules. Stop by to see the stones and the museum soon!
Interested in working at the Museum? We're hiring JHU sophomores and juniors! Please email archmuseum@jhu.edu with the following information by midnight Sept 30th. Selected students will be interviewed and hired in mid-October. Send in:
--a cover letter that describes your interest in the museum and any experience or coursework that would be applicable
--a resume
--the names of two JHU faculty who can recommend your work.
Students with all majors are welcome. You must be available to work for at least three hours a week during the museum's open hours, Monday through Friday from 10:30-1:30.
MERCI! Thanks to Professor Guido Furci's "Advanced Writing and Speaking in French" course for visiting the museum and looking at Roman Egyptian mummy portrait heads as part of their coursework.


The museum just was awarded a $136,000 "Museums for America" grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services! Learn more about our award and our plans for it here:
http://hub.jhu.edu/2014/09/18/archaeological-museum-imls-grant


An exhibition on Mendes Cohen, who donated nearly 700 ancient Egyptian objects to the Archaeological Museum in 1884, opens on Sunday. Come to see objects that the Museum has loaned to the exhibit. You can also hear a panel discussion (including panelist Curator/Conservator Sanchita Balachandran) on the creation of the exhibit at 5:45pm.


jewishmuseummd.org
jewishmuseummd.org
The Museum will be on Baltimore Public Radio (fm 88.1) this coming Thursday at 5:45pm. In the spring semester, Curator/Conservator Sanchita Balachandran will teach a course attempting to recreating ancient Greek ceramics in the museum's collection. Here's a sneak peak of the course. All undergraduate and graduate students--in disciplines from archaeology, classics, art history, chemistry, art, materials science and any others who are ready to work with clay are welcome to join in! http://www.mdhc.org/programs/humanities-connection/on-air-segments/


Upcoming Segments | Maryland Humanities Council
www.mdhc.org
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