Last week, students in Craig Hankin's "Still Life/Interior/Landscape" course drew ceramics and glass objects from the museum collection. Wonderful to see our objects being studied and examined in another way!


"Still Life/Interior/Landscape" course visits the museum
Last week, students in Craig Hankin's "Still Life/Interior/Landscape" course drew ceramics and glass objects from the museum collection. Wonderful to see our objects being studied and examined in another way!
Our upcoming Museum Chat on Saturday February 1st from 12:30 to 1pm features a Roman funerary inscription with the words, "Because you have robbed me, you shall not be allowed to see the light of day again..." Hear Elisabeth Campbell, graduate student in the Department of Classics and Anna Gorman and Amanda Witherspoon of Garrison Forest School discuss their recent research. See you there!

Cold? Stop by the museum today between 11:00-1:00 and warm up. We keep it a nice 70°F and 50% humidity in here for the safety of the collection.
Welcome back Intersession Students! The museum will be open from 11:00-1:00 Monday-Thursday until the 27th of January. We hope to see you.
The university and museum are closed today due to the inclement weather.
We're closing after tomorrow's open hours for the Winter Break. Happy holidays and best wishes for 2014! Looking forward to another year of research, discoveries and engagement with students, faculty and the public starting on January 6th!
Our next Museum Chat on Monday, November 18th will feature the opening two new museum exhibits featuring collections of Ancient Near Eastern objects from sites in Jordan and Iraq. We will have two scholars discussing these new exhibits. More details can be found on our website: http://archaeologicalmuseum.jhu.edu/the-collection/object-stories/museum-chats/

The museum's own Wolfgang A. with his hexacopter "Felix" just after a flight over Mason Quad...see the video posted below.

The museum's own Wolfgang A. designed and flew "Felix the Hexacopter" over Mason Quad last week: "I took my hexacopter, nicknamed Felix, out with Dr. Michael
Harrower's class on remote sensing in archaeology in order to get
picture of the Mason quad on campus. I received a small grant from
Johns Hopkins to build this system, which has 6 rotor blades, a
powerful battery, and a "brain" which balances the platform in flight
and can be programmed to fly according to GPS points. It also has a
camera that takes high-resolution pictures and has infrared sensing
capabilities.

Within the last few years, this sort of "do-it-yourself"
remote-controlled technology has become increasingly available and
popular for archaeological remote sensing. This technology has
tremendous potential as a fast, inexpensive, and accurate way to map
archaeological features."


There's nothing better to do on a holiday that come to the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. We're open from 10:30-1:30 today.