Jen has been busy rehousing some of our Greco-Roman lamps. While the lamps were in archival housing, it wasn't ideal for our collection. The set-up might work for a museum that keeps objects in storage for long periods, but we have found that with a teaching collection, we tend to move individual pieces around for classes or research. Having many lamps in one tray meant we would be either moving lamps that didn't need to be moved or putting the needed lamp in a temporary tray that did not have ideal support. To solve this, we are moving each lamp to its own box. Shortcuts and museums rarely go together!


The museum is thrilled to introduce Jen Torres, our new Collections Technician. Jen will be working on rehousing and photographing our collection as part of the IMLS grant the museum was awarded in 2014. The grant supports our goal of making all 10,000 objects in the collection available for study and research. Jen will be receiving her MA in Museum Studies at The George Washington University in the spring and has worked as an intern (with 4 different collections, no less) at the Smithsonian. More to come on Jen's first project. Welcome, Jen!


Game of knucklebones, anyone? The popular game was enjoyed by Roman children and adults. While real sheep and goat bones were used, the knucklebones in our collection are made of glass and metal. Check out our website to learn more about the game and find out what game you might have played as a child that is very similar.


Knucklebones | Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
archaeologicalmuseum.jhu.edu
Knucklebones By Alexandra Good Ephedrismos Group (Piggyback Girls) Knucklebones Red-Figure Alabastron Alexandra Good ('13) was a History of Art Major and a Writing Seminars Minor. Measurements: Length 1.8 cm, Width 1.0 cm, Depth 3.1 cm Material: Glass and Copper Alloy Date: Unknown Origin: Unknown F…
The museum will be closed today due to the University's weather delay. Hope you are enjoying the weather wherever you may be - we are thrilled to have Facebook fans from over 45 countries!
Can you see the museum?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ncf9cjSeBo&feature=youtu.be


Johns Hopkins University - Thank You 2014

A thank you message from Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels. Video by: Johns Hopkins Office of Communications thankyouvideo@jhu.edu
Students, the deadline for submitting abstracts is today! So send it in - one step closer to a well-deserved winter break (or time in the field for many of you).


The work of an outstanding conservator, Pamela Hatchfield of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, revealed the earliest time capsule in the US! Yay conservation and American history!


1795 time capsule found in Boston capitol
www.usatoday.com
A time capsule buried in 1795 by Paul Revere and Sam Adams was earthed Thursday in Boston at the Massachusetts State House, and it may be the oldest such artifact ever uncovered

Timeline Photos
Congratulations to museum employee Molly Chisholm Martell as she finishes up her thesis (and Dean's Undergraduate Research Award supported) research project, "An Investigation of Elemental Biogenic Uptake: The Examination of Portable X-ray Fluorescence as a Method of Osteological Analysis". She graduates this December but will be around to continue her research in the spring. We'll miss her but look forward to hearing more from her as she moves on to new projects and places. — with Molly Chisholm Martell.
Congratulations to museum employee Molly Chisholm Martell as she finishes up her thesis (and Dean's Undergraduate Research Award supported) research project, "An Investigation of Elemental Biogenic Uptake: The Examination of Portable X-ray Fluorescence as a Method of Osteological Analysis". She graduates this December but will be around to continue her research in the spring. We'll miss her but look forward to hearing more from her as she moves on to new projects and places.


On Dec 11th, the Maryland area heard on WYPR about "Archaeology and the Ceramic Artist" from master potter Matthew Hyleck of Baltimore Clayworks. If you are a regular reader of the museum's Facebook page, you know that he is going to work with curator/conservator Sanchita Balachandran on a course next semester that attempts to recreate ancient Greek pottery. Exciting stuff!
http://www.mdhc.org/programs/humanities-connection/on-air-segments/


Upcoming Segments | Maryland Humanities Council
www.mdhc.org
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