Facial Reconstruction of Ancient Egyptian Mummies

CT scanning with Elliot Fishman at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Outpatient Center

CT scanning with Elliot Fishman at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Outpatient Center

Combining the expertise of a forensic artist and anthropologist, a facial prosthetist, radiologists andbiomedical engineers, an Egyptian archaeologist, and an art conservator, this project will digitally reconstruct the faces of two ancient Egyptian individuals in the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. A female mummy (on loan from Goucher College) and a male skull, both of whom have been associated with Baltimore for over a century, and have lost their ancient identities by their removal from their original funerary contexts. By reconstructing their faces in collaboration with a number of specialists, and rendering them more recognizably human, this project seeks to return identities to these human remains. A team of undergraduate and graduate students embedded in the project will document the progress of the reconstructions for the public through a series of blog entries as well as visual representations such as drawings. The students will also develop a public program for museum visitors concerning the funerary practices of ancient Egyptians, the collecting practices of the past, the role of scientific and imaging technologies in studying the ancient dead, and the respectful stewardship of human remains.

This project is generously funded through a Johns Hopkins University Arts Innovation Grant sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The reconstruction works continues from the fall of 2016 through the fall of 2017.

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