A History of the Archaeological Museum

By
Elise Ansher
Elise Ansher ('13) is an undergraduate majoring in Archaeology and minoring in Museums & Society at Johns Hopkins. She is an undergraduate employee at the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum and has done field work in Maryland with UMD Archaeology in Annapolis.

A 1915 image of the Archaeological Museum in McCoy Hall at the downtown Hopkins campus. Image courtesy of the Johns Hopkins University Archives.

A History of the Archaeological Museum

Johns Hopkins University, opened in 1876, was a primary mover in the intellectual growth of Industrial-era Baltimore City. The history of the university’s archaeological collection, tied to the Oriental Seminary and the Classics department at its inception, reflects the growth and development of several departments from the turn of the century on, exemplifying the impact of the Enlightenment on an American university and city.  Guided by the University’s founding ideals and curated with education as its goal, the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Collection bolstered scholarship within the Johns Hopkins University and the greater Baltimore community.

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