Bronze Statuette of Horus the Child

By
Laura Somenzi
Laura Maria Somenzi is a senior in the Art History department and Museums and Society Program. She focuses on Italian Renaissance art and will continue her studies at Emory University as a doctoral candidate in the fall of 2013.
Bronze statuette of Horus the Child, ECM 173, Eton College Myers Collection

Bronze statuette of Horus the Child, ECM 173, Eton College Myers Collection

Bronze Statuette of Horus the Child

This research concerns the Eton collection’s small bronze statuette of the god Horus and seeks to understand the votive context and symbolic function of the object, both through an analysis of its iconography and its physical making. If one looks closely at the detail working on the statuette, and compares it to other like models, it is apparent that the object was made quickly and without extensive focus on refinement. Likely modeled in the clay before casting, this method seems most appropriate for a rapid, large-scale production. Looking at this and other evidence, the paper argues that the statuette was possibly made for a large temple market where like models would have been sold in great quantities.

 

 

 

 

The full presentation is available here: