Hérica Valladares is assistant professor of Classics at Johns Hopkins University. Trained both as a classicist and an art historian, she teaches interdisciplinary courses on Pompeii, early modern antiquarianism, Roman landscape art and the history of archaeology. At Hopkins, she participates in the Undergraduate Archaeology Program and the Program in Museums and Society. She also serves in the Advisory Board of the JHUAM. She is currently working on a book entitled, "On Roman Tenderness: Painting and Poetry in the Early Empire."

The Roman House at Hopkins

In the past two decades, Roman domestic art and architecture has become a lively field of scholarly inquiry.  For the ancient Romans, the house was not merely a private space for interacting with family and close friends, but a nexus for a wide range of social rituals and activities.  As such, the topic of the [...]

The Roman House at Hopkins

In the past two decades, Roman domestic art and architecture has become a lively field of scholarly inquiry.  For the ancient Romans, the house was not merely a private space for interacting with family and close friends, but a nexus for a wide range of social rituals and activities.  As such, the topic of the [...]

Archaeology of Daily Life

After a two-year renovation and reinstallation process, the Johns Hopkins University Archaeological Museum re-opened its doors to the public in December 2010. Since the JHU archeological collection was first established in 1882, its main purpose has been to stimulate innovative research through the close study of objects. In the spirit of continuing this tradition, I [...]