Volusia Romana

By
Elisabeth Campbell
Elisabeth Campbell is a graduate student in the Classics Department at Johns Hopkins, where she is writing a dissertation on Roman victory cognomina during the Republican period. Through her work with the museum, Elisabeth has further developed a special interest in Roman epigraphy and numismatics.
and
  • Accession Number: JHUAM 48 (Wilson 132)
  • Measurements: Height: 37.1 cm, Width: 48 cm, Thickness: 4 cm
  • Material: Marble
  • Date/Culture: Roman,  2nd – 3rd century CE.
  • Provenance: Rome, Italy

Translation

“To the spirits of the dead: for Volusia Romana, pious mother (lived 70 years). Bononius Syntrophes and Volusius Asclepiades made [this monument] for themselves and their relatives. 8 feet in depth, 9 feet in frontage [i.e, the size of burial plot]”

Description

This stone was set up for a woman named Volusia Romana who died at 70 years of age. Presumably the two men mentioned as builders of the monument are her sons. The last two lines contain a common formula, specifying the size of the burial plot. It was supposed to be 9 feet wide at the front (“IN F”, or  in fronte), meaning the street side of the tomb; and 8 feet deep, extending into the area next to the road (“IN A”, or in agro).

References

H.L. Wilson; R. van Deman Magoffin, “Latin Inscriptions at the Johns Hopkins University VIII,” American Journal of Philology 35 (1914), 421-434, 432.

The inscription is described in the US Epigraphy Project hosted by Brown University.